Obama and Clinton condemn Charlottesville violence


Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton have both spoken out to condemn the violence and racial clashes at the deadly white nationalist rally in Virginia.

The former President quoted civil rights icon Martin Luther King in a tweet on Saturday night as violent clashes between white supremacist groups and counter-protesters unfolded in Charlottesville. 

‘No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion,’ Obama wrote.

Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton have both spoken out to condemn the violence and racial clashes at the deadly white nationalist rally in Virginia on Saturday

The former President quoted civil rights icon Martin Luther King in a tweet on Saturday night

The former President quoted civil rights icon Martin Luther King in a tweet on Saturday night

The former President quoted civil rights icon Martin Luther King in a tweet on Saturday night

‘People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.’

Obama has mostly refrained from making public comments since leaving office in January.

His former secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, also weighed in on Twitter on the Charlottesville devastation saying her heart was with the city and ‘everyone made to feel unsafe in their country’. 

‘The incitement of hatred that got us here is as real and condemnable as the white supremacists in our streets,’ Clinton tweeted. 

‘Every minute we allow this to persist through tacit encouragement or inaction is a disgrace, & corrosive to our values.

‘Now is the time for leaders to be strong in their words & deliberate in their actions.

Hillary Clinton also weighed in on Twitter on the Charlottesville devastation saying her heart was with the city and 'everyone made to feel unsafe in their country'

Hillary Clinton also weighed in on Twitter on the Charlottesville devastation saying her heart was with the city and 'everyone made to feel unsafe in their country'

Hillary Clinton also weighed in on Twitter on the Charlottesville devastation saying her heart was with the city and ‘everyone made to feel unsafe in their country’

Heather Heyer, 32, was killed and 19 others were injured when a car (above) driven by James Alex Fields Jr. rammed into a crowd of protesters 

Heather Heyer, 32, was killed and 19 others were injured when a car (above) driven by James Alex Fields Jr. rammed into a crowd of protesters 

Heather Heyer, 32, was killed and 19 others were injured when a car (above) driven by James Alex Fields Jr. rammed into a crowd of protesters 

Fields Jr, (right) who is being held at the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail, has since been charged with second-degree murder over Heather Heyer’s death

‘We will not step backward. If this is not who we are as Americans, let’s prove it.’ 

One was killed and dozens were injured amid what is believed to be the largest group of white nationalists to come together in a decade to protest the city’s decision to remove a Confederate monument.

Heather Heyer, 32, was killed and 19 others were injured when a car driven by James Alex Fields Jr. rammed into a crowd of protesters. 

Fields Jr, who is being held at the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail, has since been charged with second-degree murder. 

His arrest capped off hours of unrest. 

Witnesses said the car was traveling up to 40 miles an hour when it hit and reversed before ramming into the crowd again and speeding off with someone's shoe attached to its bumper

Witnesses said the car was traveling up to 40 miles an hour when it hit and reversed before ramming into the crowd again and speeding off with someone's shoe attached to its bumper

Witnesses said the car was traveling up to 40 miles an hour when it hit and reversed before ramming into the crowd again and speeding off with someone’s shoe attached to its bumper

The clashes are believed to be the largest group of white nationalists to come together in a decade to protest the city's decision to remove a Confederate monument

The clashes are believed to be the largest group of white nationalists to come together in a decade to protest the city's decision to remove a Confederate monument

The clashes are believed to be the largest group of white nationalists to come together in a decade to protest the city’s decision to remove a Confederate monument

Hundreds of people threw punches, hurled water bottles and unleashed chemical sprays. Some came prepared for a fight, with body armor and helmets. Videos that ricocheted around the world on social media showed people beating each other with sticks and shields. 

Some of the white nationalists at Saturday’s rally cited President Donald Trump’s victory after a campaign of racially-charged rhetoric as validation for their beliefs.

Trump criticized the violence in a tweet Saturday, followed by a press conference and a call for ‘a swift restoration of law and order.’

‘We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides,’ he said. 

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced late Saturday that federal authorities will pursue a civil rights investigation into the circumstances surrounding the crash.