Carla Pincombe donated eggs to help couples become parents


A mother has opened up about her gracious decision to help couples struggling to conceive by donating her eggs.

Carla Pincombe, from Melbourne, started donating her eggs to other childless couples to help families share the joys of parenthood.

And four-and-a-half-years later, the 38-year-old has helped eight couples become parents – resulting in 10 children – after having three daughters of her own.

The doting mother-of-three revealed she enjoyed pregnancy so much, she even carried a baby girl for same-sex couple Andy Brough and Simon Curtis.

Doting mother Carla Pincombe decided to donate her eggs after having three daughters of her own - nine-year-old Aurora, Saskia, aged seven, and six-year-old Reverie (pictured together)

Doting mother Carla Pincombe decided to donate her eggs after having three daughters of her own - nine-year-old Aurora, Saskia, aged seven, and six-year-old Reverie (pictured together)

Doting mother Carla Pincombe decided to donate her eggs after having three daughters of her own – nine-year-old Aurora, Saskia, aged seven, and six-year-old Reverie (pictured together)

The  mother-of-three revealed she enjoyed pregnancy so much, she even carried baby girl Adaline for same-sex couple Andy Brough and Simon Curtis (pictured together)

The  mother-of-three revealed she enjoyed pregnancy so much, she even carried baby girl Adaline for same-sex couple Andy Brough and Simon Curtis (pictured together)

The mother-of-three revealed she enjoyed pregnancy so much, she even carried baby girl Adaline for same-sex couple Andy Brough and Simon Curtis (pictured together)

‘For me, I always wanted to be a mum,’ Ms Pincombe told Daily Mail Australia. 

‘I was really sad after having my third child because we weren’t planning on having anymore children. So it was an easy decision to make to help other people.’

From there, she joined the Egg Donation Australia group where she met childless couples who were eager to start a family of their own.

After undergoing the egg donation procedures in a space of more than four years, the young mother has successfully created 10 children.

‘To be able to do something so easy but so heartbreaking for other people finding it difficult to have children, it’s very exciting and humbling as well,’ she said.

‘Seeing these people with kids is just an incredible feeling.’

Loving family: The fathers and Ms Pincombe welcomed baby girl Adaline earlier this year

Loving family: The fathers and Ms Pincombe welcomed baby girl Adaline earlier this year

Loving family: The fathers and Ms Pincombe welcomed baby girl Adaline earlier this year

The 38-year-old mother-of-three said she and her fathers are planning a sibling for Adaline

The 38-year-old mother-of-three said she and her fathers are planning a sibling for Adaline

The 38-year-old mother-of-three said she and her fathers are planning a sibling for Adaline

The fertile mother decided to be a surrogate for Andy and Simon by carrying their baby daughter after using her own eggs

The fertile mother decided to be a surrogate for Andy and Simon by carrying their baby daughter after using her own eggs

The fertile mother decided to be a surrogate for Andy and Simon by carrying their baby daughter after using her own eggs

Following the birth of her daughters – nine-year-old Aurora, Saskia, aged seven, and six-year-old Reverie – Ms Pincombe wanted to go through pregnancy all over again. 

‘I just love what our bodies can do,’ she explained.

‘I really enjoyed getting pregnant, going into labour and giving birth. It’s a miracle to feel the baby move around and you always got someone keeping you company.

‘So when I was pregnant with our third child, I was sad we weren’t getting more kids.’

Ms Pincombe cradling little baby Adaline

Ms Pincombe cradling little baby Adaline

Ms Pincombe cradling little baby Adaline

But the fertile mother decided to be a surrogate for Andy and Simon by carrying their baby daughter after using her own eggs.

‘I initially donated my eggs to them because they had their own surrogate,’ she said.

‘Unfortunately, she couldn’t fall pregnant so I said: “my eggs are ready so I’m ready to carry them”,’ she recalled as she laughed.

Under Australian law, it’s illegal to get paid to be a surrogate but Ms Pincombe said all she wanted was to share the joys of parenthood with childless couples.

‘The pregnancy was a great experience. It was totally different to my own pregnancies because I was more focused on their happiness and joy,’ she said.

‘I got a lot of joy carrying their baby and I was keeping them both involved during the process because they didn’t have the benefit of going through what I did.’

Happy family: Ms Pincombe already has three daughters of her own but she wanted to donate her eggs to other childless couples to help families share the joys of parenthood

Happy family: Ms Pincombe already has three daughters of her own but she wanted to donate her eggs to other childless couples to help families share the joys of parenthood

Happy family: Ms Pincombe already has three daughters of her own but she wanted to donate her eggs to other childless couples to help families share the joys of parenthood

Sister bonding!  Aurora, Saskia, and youngest sister Reverie building memories together

Sister bonding!  Aurora, Saskia, and youngest sister Reverie building memories together

Sister bonding! Aurora, Saskia, and youngest sister Reverie building memories together

Ms Pincombe said she wanted the fathers to be part of her pregnacy journey from the start

Ms Pincombe said she wanted the fathers to be part of her pregnacy journey from the start

Ms Pincombe said she wanted the fathers to be part of her pregnacy journey from the start

Ms Pincombe and the fathers welcomed little girl Adaline earlier this year.

‘We’re actually planning a sibling for Adaline next year,’ she said.

The doting mother said she has told her three daughters aged under 10 about her role with egg donating and surrogacy.

‘The girls have met all the children who have been born from my eggs,’ she said.

‘I started explaining to them where babies come from. I told them my friends wanted to have a baby but couldn’t so they took my eggs to see if she could grow their baby.

‘As they’ve gotten older, they have asked me more questions and I’ve answered them with age appropriate answers. They’ve all enjoyed being part of the process.

‘I’ve talked about it since I started donating eggs. They understand how babies come to be and how people really want to have children but some struggle.’

Ms Pincombe with another recipient - fathers Clinton and Callum with their two daughters - both from her eggs

Ms Pincombe with another recipient - fathers Clinton and Callum with their two daughters - both from her eggs

Ms Pincombe with another recipient – fathers Clinton and Callum with their two daughters – both from her eggs

After undergoing the egg donation procedures in a space of more than four years, the young mother has successfully created 10 children

After undergoing the egg donation procedures in a space of more than four years, the young mother has successfully created 10 children

After undergoing the egg donation procedures in a space of more than four years, the young mother has successfully created 10 children

Ms Pincombe's three young daughters smiling at the camera with little Clarabel - born from her eggs also

Ms Pincombe's three young daughters smiling at the camera with little Clarabel - born from her eggs also

Ms Pincombe’s three young daughters smiling at the camera with little Clarabel – born from her eggs also

Ms Pincombe said she has stayed in contact with all of her recipients – and her daughters have met with the children.

‘I have become really good friends with all of my recipients and their kids are part of our life and my kids are part of their lives,’ she said.

Ms Pincombe said she has stayed in contact with all of her recipients - and her daughters have met with the children

Ms Pincombe said she has stayed in contact with all of her recipients - and her daughters have met with the children

Ms Pincombe said she has stayed in contact with all of her recipients – and her daughters have met with the children

‘We’ve all just created a nice, big extended family.’

And when it comes to donating eggs or being a surrogate, Ms Pincombe said the clinic requirements differ state to state.

‘Generally you need to be 21-38 and willing to go through an IVF cycle to help someone else have children. In some states donors need to have had children themselves,’ she said.

‘There is counselling involved to work through questions, but a donor needs to be able to separate themselves from their genetics – be able to help someone else have a child without feeling that the resulting child is theirs. 

‘Surrogacy is much the same. Generally surrogates need to be 25-54, and often need to have had a child already. 

‘Someone who wants to be a surrogate needs to be able to carry for someone else without getting attached to the baby in a maternal way. 

‘We all love and nurture the children we carry, but not as their mother.’